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Smith & Wesson Tactical Pen Provides Defensive Options in Gun-Free Zones

October 30, 2016 Leave a comment

When Edward Bulwer-Lytton wrote his now famous adage “the pen is mightier than the sword” for his play “Richelieu” in 1839, he had no idea that his words would literally become part of the American lexicon with the advent of the tactical pen approximately 175 years later. tactical-pen

So what is a tactical pen exactly?  Tactical pens are instruments designed for the dual purpose of everyday writing tasks, but also have an alter ego as a last-resort defensive weapon.

They are generally machined from high-quality metal such as anodized aluminum and are combined with pressurized ink cartridges originally designed for the weightlessness of space.

A tactical pen has the potential to become a defensive weapon in several ways. It can be used as an impact weapon, a last resort piercing weapon, or as a sort of Kubotan. A Kubotan is a 5” cylindrical weapon known for being extremely effective in breaking the will of uncooperative subjects through the use of painful locks and pressure point strikes. As a result they became known as “attitude adjustment instruments.”  Due to their popularity, tactical pens have been dubbed the Kubotans of the 21st century.

A tactical pen is generally less obvious and more useful than a Kubotan, since in addition to its tactical capabilities, has a more mundane function as well. Smith & Wesson has entered the tactical pen market with its own version, the SWPENBK. As author Scott W. Wagner describes in his article “Tactical Ink Pens: Low-Profile Defensive Tools” at USConcealedCarry.com, the pen can be a formidable weapon:

“If you found yourself the victim of a close range attack—one in which you were in danger of serious physical harm (including sexual assault) — and were justified in using your firearm, but did not have it available, then the Smith & Wesson Tactical pen might be a good potential option for defending your life.” (Read more at USConcealedCarry.com)

The Smith & Wesson SWPENBK tactical pen is 6.1 inches long and weighs a mere 1.6 ounces. It is crafted from T6061 aircraft grade aluminum with a tapered and fluted main shaft that could serve as a makeshift Kubotan when used properly.

The cap end screws on and off or with the M&P model, clicks on and off.  The pen itself uses a Schmidt P900M Parker Style Black Ball Point Ink Cartridge, but you may want to consider upgrading to a pressurized “write anywhere” cartridge for about ten bucks.  A nice feature is the heavy-duty pocket clip which is securely attached with two bolts.

Smith & Wesson’s SWPENBK is an excellent alternative weapon to carry in areas where guns are banned or defensive devices such as knives or Kubotans are not considered kosher. While the SWPENBK looks like a normal pen, do not attempt to take it through airport security.  Many TSA personnel are aware of tactical pens and will confiscate them as weapons.

As with all Smith & Wesson products, the SWPENBK comes with a lifetime warranty for manufacturing defects.  It can be found online for about $23.

TUFF Products and Sentinel Concepts Combine Technology to Produce Blaster Bag Pro

October 30, 2016 Leave a comment

One of the key components of ongoing concealed carry training is time spent at a shooting range.  Naturally, the ultimate objective of going to the range is to spend as much time as possible shooting at targets. What you don’t want to do is waste an inordinate amount of time and energy digging through a disorganized backpack or duffel trying to find spare magazines, revolver clips, grips, or other accessories. blaster-bag-pro

Two of the leaders in firearm training and accessory products decided to combine their considerable design and engineering savvy to produce what may be the ultimate range bag.

The Blaster Bag Pro from TUFF Products and Sentinel Concepts is projected to be available soon, marketed under Sentinel Concepts ELITE collection of TUFF Products.

The Blaster Bag Pro is somewhat atypical in appearance from the stereotypical range bag as author Scott W. Wagner describes in his article “Sentinel Concepts/TUFF Products ‘Blaster Bag Pro’ Range Bag” at USConcealedCarry.com:

“As such, it really doesn’t give off the appearance of a pistol case at first glance because there are no flap pockets on the outside. There is a large zipper pocket on the outside that can accommodate pens, notebooks, or compact cleaning kits.” (Read more at USConcealedCarry.com)

Made of rugged ballistic nylon, the Blaster Bag Pro is in the shape of a laptop bag that opens into a wide v-shape to allow easy access to the interior contents.  Inside, there are padded pockets on either side where you can safely and securely stow your firearms.  There are also four pouches designed to accommodate extra magazines and a larger compartment that can hold an AR-15 magazine or other similar sized items such as flashlights or tools.

Dimensions of the Blaster Bag Pro are 14x10x5 inches with wide nylon carrying straps for easy transport.  At the range, the bag unzips all the way around to allow quick, easy access to anything inside, but the design of the bag doesn’t limit it to the range. Its non-threatening appearance makes it ideal to bring along on a road trip as an additional piece of luggage with the secure gun pouches keeping your weapons out-of-sight from any prying eyes.

The Sentinel Concepts/TUFF Products Blaster Bag Pro will be available in blue, red, coyote brown, and black with an approximate MSRP around $45.

What the Second Amendment Really Guarantees

October 30, 2016 Leave a comment

Anyone who owns a concealed carry permit is very familiar with the Second Amendment and likely has very strong views on what freedoms are guaranteed by one of the most familiar addendums to the U.S. Constitution. The Bill of Rights is an extension of the U.S. Constitution that attempted to close loopholes not covered by the Founders in the original document. gold-bullets

Yet the Second Amendment is not a statute that provides a legal basis for citizens of the United States to keep and bear arms.

As Beth Alcazar explains in her article “The Second Amendment Gives Nothing…” at USConcealedCarry.com, the Second Amendment is simply the medium for the message:

“The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution protects and guarantees the right of individuals to keep and bear arms. It affirms our right. And what the Second Amendment was designed to do is prohibit government from infringing upon that right.” (Read more at USConcealedCarry.com)

One of the reasons America was colonized was because of the desire the colonists had to live in a place where they could exercise the inalienable rights that they felt had been subjugated in the countries they’d left behind. They were anxious to create a system where rights and liberties were permanent and available to all, such as the right to keep and bear arms.

In other words, the Second Amendment is basically putting the government on notice with a reminder of sorts, regarding what the Framers intended when they wrote the original Constitution.

Another key word in the Second Amendment is the term “infringed.” Although the word itself doesn’t brim with power, it certainly can invoke strong emotions when used to keep abuse of power in check. In its simplest form, infringed means to wrongfully violate or restrict the rights of another. The Founders chose this word deliberately, as a warning signal covering a wide swath of potential government intrusions, excesses, and basic human rights violations.

The colonial leaders understood the natural right to protect “life, limb and property” early on. Yet it wasn’t the Native Americans or the wild animals on the frontier that they worried most about. Jefferson wrote that “The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.”

Some things never change.

Knife Attack Survival Strategies

October 2, 2016 Leave a comment

Many concealed carry permit holders spend untold hours at the range, honing their handgun skills at drawing, aiming, movement, and of course, shooting. But no matter how adept they become with a firearm, those skills may not necessarily be useful if an attacker decides to opt for a different type of assault; a close encounter of the knife kind.agent-47-with-a-knife

Knife attacks are on the rise in the U.S. for a number of reasons. The most obvious one is ease of access.  Anyone, regardless of criminal background, can walk into their neighborhood Walmart, Bass Pro Shop, or swap meet and pick out their blade of choice, from pen knife to machete.

Unfortunately, there is a far more sinister reason behind the upswing in edged weapon attacks.  The terrorist organization ISIS has a predilection for knife attacks, believing it is the preferred murder weapon of Allah, as documented in the Fox News article “Blade of Jihad: Extremists Embrace the Knife as Tool of Terror.”

Radicalized Muslims worldwide are using easily obtained knives to administer “Allah’s will” as witnessed by the September 2014 incident in Oklahoma where a recently fired employee entered the company building, stabbed two females, and then proceeded to behead one in the same style as the sensationalized ISIS internet videos. And in September 2016, an attacker stabbed 8 victims in a bloody Minnesota mall rampage and apparently asked at least one victim if they were Muslim.

So how does one avoid becoming a knife attack victim? Well, according to author Scott W. Wagner in his article “Knife Attack: How Do You Respond?” at USConcealedCarry.com, the key is distance:

“In order for a potential victim to avoid becoming an actual victim, he or she must maintain distance and use it to his or her advantage.” (Read more at USConcealedCarry.com)

In order for a knife attack to be successful, the attacker must be in close proximity to the victim.  The attack-free zone is generally considered to be 21 feet.  This distance was determined by law enforcement professionals to be the minimum distance required in order to have time to draw a weapon, aim, and fire. The distance would likely be 75 feet or more for someone carrying a firearm under a shirt, tucked in a belt, or stashed in a purse.

There are a few tips that will help increase the odds of surviving a random knife attack for those carrying concealed weapons.

First, maintain a high level of situational awareness when out in public and ask for ID from anyone purporting to be law enforcement or security. At the same time, try to keep your firearm as accessible as possible without making it obvious.

Use some range time to practice weak hand shooting; a random attack may slash your strong hand.  Practice drawing from concealed carry positions.  Since time is paramount, mount a laser sight to your gun. It will save precious seconds while trying to aim.  Finally, watch the YouTube video Surviving Edged Weapons, a law enforcement training classic that describes how to survive a knife attack.

Following these guidelines, along with common sense and a little preparation will go a long way toward helping you survive a random attack, or better yet, avoid it altogether.