Knife Attack Survival Strategies

October 2, 2016 Leave a comment

Many concealed carry permit holders spend untold hours at the range, honing their handgun skills at drawing, aiming, movement, and of course, shooting. But no matter how adept they become with a firearm, those skills may not necessarily be useful if an attacker decides to opt for a different type of assault; a close encounter of the knife kind.agent-47-with-a-knife

Knife attacks are on the rise in the U.S. for a number of reasons. The most obvious one is ease of access.  Anyone, regardless of criminal background, can walk into their neighborhood Walmart, Bass Pro Shop, or swap meet and pick out their blade of choice, from pen knife to machete.

Unfortunately, there is a far more sinister reason behind the upswing in edged weapon attacks.  The terrorist organization ISIS has a predilection for knife attacks, believing it is the preferred murder weapon of Allah, as documented in the Fox News article “Blade of Jihad: Extremists Embrace the Knife as Tool of Terror.”

Radicalized Muslims worldwide are using easily obtained knives to administer “Allah’s will” as witnessed by the September 2014 incident in Oklahoma where a recently fired employee entered the company building, stabbed two females, and then proceeded to behead one in the same style as the sensationalized ISIS internet videos. And in September 2016, an attacker stabbed 8 victims in a bloody Minnesota mall rampage and apparently asked at least one victim if they were Muslim.

So how does one avoid becoming a knife attack victim? Well, according to author Scott W. Wagner in his article “Knife Attack: How Do You Respond?” at, the key is distance:

“In order for a potential victim to avoid becoming an actual victim, he or she must maintain distance and use it to his or her advantage.” (Read more at

In order for a knife attack to be successful, the attacker must be in close proximity to the victim.  The attack-free zone is generally considered to be 21 feet.  This distance was determined by law enforcement professionals to be the minimum distance required in order to have time to draw a weapon, aim, and fire. The distance would likely be 75 feet or more for someone carrying a firearm under a shirt, tucked in a belt, or stashed in a purse.

There are a few tips that will help increase the odds of surviving a random knife attack for those carrying concealed weapons.

First, maintain a high level of situational awareness when out in public and ask for ID from anyone purporting to be law enforcement or security. At the same time, try to keep your firearm as accessible as possible without making it obvious.

Use some range time to practice weak hand shooting; a random attack may slash your strong hand.  Practice drawing from concealed carry positions.  Since time is paramount, mount a laser sight to your gun. It will save precious seconds while trying to aim.  Finally, watch the YouTube video Surviving Edged Weapons, a law enforcement training classic that describes how to survive a knife attack.

Following these guidelines, along with common sense and a little preparation will go a long way toward helping you survive a random attack, or better yet, avoid it altogether.

Inland M37 Ithaca Trench Shotgun Replica: A Blast from the Past

September 25, 2016 Leave a comment

Although AR-15s are all the rage in gun circles right now, this hasn’t always been the case.  It wasn’t long ago that the tactical pump shotgun was the mainstay of law enforcement throughout the country and was still being used fairly often by the military. Yet even with the popularity of the AR-15s, the shotgun still has legions of fans and one in particular is so popular that Inland Manufacturing made the decision to manufacture a replica of it — the famed M37 Ithaca Trench Shotgun.dude-with-ithaca

Inland teamed with Ithaca Gun Company to create the 12-Gauge recreation of a weapon the U.S. Navy Seals depended on in Vietnam. The point man of the SEAL team would carry the Ithaca M37 because of the formidable 12-gauge caliber rounds it could unleash at point blank range in the dense jungle.

Ithaca uses their 18-inch barreled Defense Gun with its standard bottom feeding and ejection port as the foundation for the M37 Trench Shotgun. Then by using Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling, the shotgun undergoes three modifications.

The first change is the replacement of the Defense Gun’s 18-inch barrel with a 20-inch version of the original, complete with beaded sight. The next modification is a bayonet mount, which also acts as a heat shield. Although no bayonet is included, the addition of the mount/shield provides a definite boost to the Inland M37 Shotgun’s cool factor. The final modification is the replacement of the Defense Gun’s rubber recoil pad with a military-style grooved buttplate.

The M37 Trench Shotgun is very sharp-looking with rich oil-finished walnut stocks that could match up to many of today’s most expensive guns. The modifications not only provide an aggressive tactical look, but help increase the accuracy of the shotgun.

Author Scott W. Wagner explains how the modernized M37 Trench Shotgun improves overall efficiency for the shooter in his article “Inland Manufacturing 12-Gauge M37 Trench Shotgun: A Historic Reproduction Ready for Duty” at

“The extra two inches of barrel and the weight of the heat shield and bayonet mount impart more weight up front, which helps keep the muzzle locked on target for rapid-fire shooting. “ (Read more at USConcealedCarry)

During range testing, the Inland M37 proved itself combat ready. Using a variety of ammo, the Trench Shotgun was consistently true to the point of aim and at a distance of 30 feet, four-inch groupings of eight pellets were the norm.

If this weapon has piqued your interest and you would like to purchase a working recreation of one of the workhorses of Vietnam ground forces, be prepared for sticker shock. The MSRP on the Inland M37 Trench Shotgun is $1259. However, you can rest easy knowing that you are the proud owner of not only a great shotgun from a historic standpoint, but an excellent modern home defense weapon.

Learn to Use Concealment Options

September 18, 2016 Leave a comment

“Concealed carry” is a term that is tossed about rather loosely when discussing firearms, self-defense, or other Second Amendment issues in public forums. Yet even with the rapid growth of concealed carry permit applications in the United States, little thought is given to the intended meaning of the word “concealed” once training is completed.gun-in-coat

In his article “Depths of Concealment: How Deep is Too Deep?” at, author George Harris provides the definition used in reference to firearms:

“Concealment relevant to firearms or other weapons simply means carrying a weapon in a manner in which only the person carrying knows what, where, and even if he or she is carrying.” (Read more at

Basically, concealment is a series of compromises. It begins with your choice of weapon. Options such as weight, size, and print must be taken into consideration as does practicality. A deeply concealed weapon that is inaccessible when you need it defeats the purpose.

Accessibility should be the primary consideration regarding levels of concealment. Unfortunately, everyday attire can often cause retrieval issues when trying to draw the weapon. In an ideal scenario, the weapon should be accessible with either hand, but in most of the common concealment locations such as the inside-the-waistband holsters, ambidextrous drawing is next to impossible.

For women, the problem is very much the same, if not worse. Designers have managed to incorporate holsters into the fabric of bras, corsets, and other undergarments that, while definitely achieve deep concealment, are problematic for practical use once a woman is fully dressed. There are some women’s apparel options that have magnetic or Velcro fasteners that cut back on the time it takes to draw the weapon.

The button overlap is also more of an issue with female clothing. Menswear generally buttons with a left over right overlap, which favors right-handed access and draw. Female blouses and dresses are the opposite, which favors a left-handed draw. Given that only about 10 percent of the population is left-handed, this puts women at a disadvantage for these types of concealment options.

For waistband and apron holsters, the problem is more one of printing and comfort. Generally, clothing worn with these items should be 2 sizes larger. This would help reduce any chafing and the larger sizes allow the material to fall away from your body and your gun.

Normal men’s trousers make it almost impossible to carry a gun in the pocket without a noticeable print, although there are some brands that have looser pockets and there are some really tiny guns on the market now. But the best solution is to purchase pants with extra material in the pockets, specifically tailored for concealed carry.  For women wearing skirts or dresses, thigh holsters are a reasonable option with fairly easy access.

Ankle holsters provide reasonable concealment and access options since most people aren’t looking there, but they aren’t particularly comfortable. Boot holsters where the gun is tucked inside the boot gives two layers of concealment and a little more comfort to the wearer.

In the end, concealment options vary widely and are dependent on many variables including clothing, climate, and potential threat. These factors aren’t always the same, so it’s important to have a flexible mindset and make the best decision each day to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Movement Drills May Save Your Life

September 4, 2016 Leave a comment

One of the basic tenets of Concealed Carry Weapons training is that the first objective should be to avoid a confrontation whenever possible. Firearms training centers on the idea that drawing and firing your handgun should always be done as a last resort and when you’re in fear for your life or that of a loved one.dude g-posing

Although the odds are very small that you’ll ever become involved in a gunfight, being prepared for the unexpected is the best way to increase the odds of survival.

There are many classes taught throughout the country that train students in a variety of close combat techniques involving handguns, knives, batons, and martial arts.

But in reality, the first thing you should do if you find yourself staring down the barrel of a handgun is to start moving. A moving target has several advantages as author and U.S. Concealed Carry editor Kevin Michalowski points out in his article “Are You Learning to Move?” at

“Movement takes you out of the line of attack. Movement forces the attacker to react to your movement. The more you move, the more you put yourself in control of the situation by forcing the attacker to react.” (Read more at

Not only will moving make you a harder target to hit, but it may surprise your attacker enough to give you a tactical advantage. The perpetrator most likely didn’t expect you to be armed or expect to have to bring down a moving target that’s shooting back. If you’re lucky, the attacker will panic and leave.  But if not, at least your actions have forced your adversary to go on the defensive and take the time to reformulate his plan of action.

Try to find a range that incorporates movement drills into their instructional programs. If none are available, then it’s a simple matter to practice movement as a part of dry fire training at home. Even a few minutes a day can build muscle memory that will significantly increase your reaction time in a confrontation.

A keen sense of situational awareness will help you identify and avoid potentially dangerous situations.  But if you do find yourself in a gunfight, remember to keep moving and keep fighting.

Use Dry Fire Training to Hone Skills

September 4, 2016 Leave a comment

Anyone who has gone through the process of obtaining a concealed carry weapons permit has heard the lecture about the importance of training.  Unfortunately for many, training becomes an afterthought rather than a priority as soon as they leave the class with their freshly printed certificate of completion. tipton round

Without training, muscle memory disappears and reaction time dwindles to the point of being dangerous. There are several reasons why training is so easily put off.

The first is the time factor. In today’s busy world, very few people have the spare time to dedicate the needed hours to range training. The other big reason for procrastinating is money. The cost of ammunition isn’t cheap and range fees add up quickly as well.

The range is the ideal place to build up basic skills as a beginning shooter and learn more advanced techniques as your competency increases.  But during the mundane interim training periods where you’re honing your technique, there’s another way to improve form that will save you time and money — dry training.

Dry training involves going through the routine of drawing, aiming and firing, but without the firing pin hitting the hammer. “Snap caps” are also made for this purpose, which are basically dummy cartridges designed to cushion the blow of the hammer and/or firing pin.  This allows for an endless number of practice rounds without the expense of live ammo. Another advantage is that dry training can be accomplished in just about any setting so that you can actually simulate a close quarters encounter in the comfort of your own home.

Author and U.S. Concealed Carry Magazine editor Kevin Michalowski describes other advantages to dry fire training in his article “Range Time vs. Dry Fire…and Why?” at

“With dry training, you can (and should) practice hundreds of perfect draws that include elements like a big step to the side to get you off the X and a verbal challenge to turn bystanders into witnesses.” (Read more at

By practicing with various scenarios, dry fire training allows you to get away from the rote routine of draw, fire, shoot, and gives you the opportunity to assess your surroundings and make better decisions before opening fire on a potentially unarmed citizen.

No amount of training will completely prepare you for a real-life attack, but through a combination of range training and dry-fire training, your odds of surviving an attack will dramatically increase.

Combine Holster Options with CrossBreed Freedom Carry

August 21, 2016 Leave a comment

It’s no secret that the concealed carry community is one of the hottest and fastest growing markets in the United States. Increased instability and threats from abroad combined with violent gang activity and desperate drug addicts at home are certainly part of the reason for why people are choosing to exercise their Second Amendment rights.crossbreed gun

Naturally, all of those guns flying off the shelves need to be holstered somewhere and as a result, holster sales are following the same skyrocketing trajectory as handguns.

For many years, holsters were basically dedicated to one carry position, which depending on the type of weapon, could result in wardrobe adjustments and an increased level of discomfort especially in the appendix position.

But now, CrossBreed Holsters has introduced a product that gives concealed carry shooters more options.  Author Scott W. Wagner describes the Freedom Carry in his article “CrossBreed Freedom Carry IWB Holster” at

“Capable of being used in appendix, cross-draw, and strong-side carry in the 3-5 o’clock position, the Freedom Carry is basically a reduced-size SuperTuck holster with the leather backing cut away to support only one locking clip.” (Read more at

Appendix carry is one of the most efficient positions for weapon placement for a couple reasons. First, the gun’s proximity to the hand allows for a very quick draw. The closeness of the hands is also a deterrent to any “gun grabbers.” The scaled-down backing design is what gives the Freedom Carry the flexibility to be comfortable in the appendix position.

In addition to the diversity of carry positions, the CrossBreed Freedom Carry can also be canted into several different angles besides the straight draw position through the use of an adjustable clip. The bulk of the holster is shaped with Kydex to fit your specific weapon. It is held in place via friction with no retention strap, so it’s a good idea to employ the safety when using it in the appendix position.

The Freedom Carry can be worn with the shirt tucked or untucked. With the shirt in, the only visible part of the holster is the clip, which can easily be covered by a cell phone. The overall comfort of the Freedom Carry was high, especially if worn against a t-shirt. Even without the t-shirt, there is enough cowhide in the design to keep the gun from rubbing against any skin area.

CrossBreed has continued its reputation for quality with the Freedom Carry holster. When ordering, you can request your holster be molded to accept weapons with accessories such as lights, lasers, and sights. It is available in black cowhide, tan cowhide, or natural tan horsehide and comes with CrossBreed’s standard lifetime warranty.  MSRP on the Freedom Carry is $64.50.

“Roughing It” Could Mean Leaving Your Gun at Home

August 14, 2016 Leave a comment

Gun owners in general and concealed carry permit holders in particular are generally vigilant people when it comes to personal and home defense planning, but those plans change radically when you decide that a family vacation in the back country is a good idea.moose

Any trip off the beaten path requires a different mindset than taking the family to the movies.

Although situational awareness is still paramount, the focal points are different. The likelihood of being confronted and robbed while in the great outdoors is slim.

An attack by any number of large animals that roam the more remote areas of national parks, forests, and Bureau of Land Management properties is more likely.

Unfortunately, firearm regulations in these areas can be tricky. A 2010 federal law makes it legal to carry firearms in national parks as long as it doesn’t infringe on local or state laws and although it may be legal to carry the weapon, likely isn’t legal to discharge it.

National park websites now have links to the applicable state firearm laws for their respective states. International borders such as the Boundary Waters area on the U.S.-Canada border create even more confusion as regulations can vary at different entry points.

The same is true to a lesser extent on U.S. federal lands, as author Tom Watson explains in his article “Backcountry Backup: Defending Your Life and Property” at

“In the case where a portion of two or more states [lie] within a park boundary, it is up to each individual to check the status of laws in each of those particular states.” (Read more at

Although the passing of the 2010 law has generated considerable debate, there has been no indication of consequences in either direction. Between 2012 and 2013, minor criminal incidents in federal lands dropped from 113,000 to 105,000. Firearm use or lack thereof was not indicated in the reports.

There has been at least one incident of isolated campers being terrorized by gun-toting marauders. The incident occurred in 2007 before the federal law was passed and is still a topic of debate today whether the outcome would have been different if the campers had been armed.

Large carnivorous animals are a legitimate concern anytime you venture into their territory, but the chances of being killed by one are remote. For instance, in a 25-year period in Alaska, a total of 90 bears were killed either in self-defense or to protect property, amounting to less than 4 bears per year. However, 6 people were killed by bears from 1985 to 1996. Alaska regulations now require people to remain at least 50 yards from bears, although the bears are probably not familiar with the law.

For those who feel more comfortable carrying a firearm as a large animal deterrent, the recommended calibers are .40 handguns and .44 Magnum revolvers or shotguns. Bear spray is also extremely effective. Before you head to the outback with a weapon, make sure you are comfortable and skilled enough with it to potentially face off with a large man-eater looking for food or defending his territory.